Jump directly to the Content

Christian History

Today in Christian History

August 10

August 10, 70: Roman troops, sent by Emperor Vespasian to put down a Jewish rebellion, break through the walls of Jerusalem and destroy the temple. Some said that the event occurred on the same day of the year as the earlier destruction of Solomon's temple by Babylonians.

August 10, 1760: Philip Embury, the first Methodist clergyman to come to America, arrives in New York. August 10, 1815

August 10, 1886: Joseph M. Scriven, Irish Plymouth Brethren hymnwriter, dies. He spent his life performing menial work for the destitute, and both of his engagements ended with the sudden deaths of his fiancees. Nonetheless, his best-known hymn is the uplifting "What a Friend We Have in Jesus.”

August 10, 1815: Samuel Leigh, the first Methodist minister in Australia, arrives in Sydney. The Methodist denomination is now Australia's third largest, with an adherence of 10 percent of the population.

Read These Next

April 17, 1492: Spain's King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella give Christopher Columbus a commission to seek a westward ocean passage to Asia. Though he was also interested in wealth, Columbus saw himself as a "Christ-bearer" who would carry Christ across the ocean to people who had never heard the gospel (see issue 35: Christopher Columbus).

April 17, 1708: Ambrose, Archbishop of Moscow from 1768-1771 is born. In 1771, in the middle of an outbreak of the plague, Ambrose (who is known for his translations ...

More from April 17
close