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3 Disaster Myths That Only Compound the Devastation

The biggest threat facing churches isn’t a disaster event—it’s how we think about disasters.
3 Disaster Myths That Only Compound the Devastation

Before I became a disaster psychologist, I was a youth pastor.

My first job in ministry was at a small, rural church near the Indiana-Illinois state line. It didn’t take me long to realize I was in over my head. Nothing had prepared me for some of the serious struggles the youth in our community were facing. After a couple of years, I decided to go on to graduate school in psychology to better prepare for life’s disasters, like the trauma and grief I had seen in the lives of some of my students.

After I graduated, our family moved to South Mississippi for my first college teaching gig. Our first Sunday there, we attended a church service down the road from our house. I still vividly remember the pastor solemnly walking to the pulpit, and in a slow Southern drawl saying, “If you remember Camille, you’ll know what I’m about to say.”

The pastor went on to describe how the killer storm Hurricane Camille had devastated Mississippi in the late 1960s. He then ...

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John Sommerville is pastor of City Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota and serves on the board of Christianity Today.
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